Middle Ages Study

Plans for a fun medieval unit study for middle school homeschool students!

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While Mahaya (9th grade) was busy with Romans, Reformers and Revolutionaries, Caleb (6th grade) and I enjoyed a shorter, simpler unit study about the medieval era.

Middle Ages Study

His “spine” curriculum was the Middle Ages lapbook from In the Hands of a Child.  Since Caleb really hates handwriting, I tried the “Type It In” version where he was able to use a computer to type his writings into the mini-books and then print them out.  It was nice to use for a change, but I still prefer the write-in version.  (The typing didn’t always line up with the lines, the folds didn’t always work with the typing space, and you had to print immediately or all typing would be lost.)

I like to staple additional worksheets to the back of our lapbooks.  You’ll notice the map from Japan in the lower right photo.  Under the map are other papers such as a research assignment comparing knights to samurai and a labeled diagram of a knight’s armor.

We added several creative lessons to our middle ages study, too.  In one of those (below), Caleb had set up a feudal system and was distributing (and redistributing) M&M’s to see how the feudal system worked.

This 15 page guide supplied directions for the M&M feudal system activity, as well as several other great ideas and quiz questions.

A very visual Armor of God lesson fit in perfectly for a little Bible training.

We always love playing games!  Medieval Alliance, a game I reviewed for The Curriculum Choice last summer, fit in perfectly.

The Living Books

Living literature, as always, was a huge part of our middle ages unit.  (We did NOT read every book on this list!  Some of the books had already been read during Caleb’s 1st cycle through the Middle Ages.  We didn’t read those again.) I use informational books to teach about particular topics. The historical fiction books become family read-alouds, books to enjoy on CD in the car, or assigned books for independent reading time. Those with a Bible/character twist become part of our Bible lesson time once a week or so.

Middle Ages Bonus Books: The Sir Cumference series by Cindy Neuschwander is a wonderful series of math literature set in the middle ages that filled in some of our math lessons during the unit

Informational Literature

CastleCastleA Medieval Feast (Reading Rainbow Books)A Medieval Feast (Reading Rainbow Books)I Wonder Why Castles Had Moats and Other Questions About Long Ago (I Wonder Why Series)I Wonder Why Castles Had Moats and Other Questions About Long Ago (I Wonder Why Series)Ms. Frizzle's Adventures: Medieval CastleMs. Frizzle’s Adventures: Medieval CastleThe Best Book of Knights and CastlesThe Best Book of Knights and CastlesUsborne Official Knight's HandbookUsborne Official Knight’s HandbookThe Making of a KnightThe Making of a KnightMarguerite Makes a BookMarguerite Makes a BookMystery Histry:Viking Longboat (Mystery History)Mystery Histry:Viking Longboat (Mystery History)How Would You Survive in the Middle Ages (How Would You Survive Ser)How Would You Survive in the Middle Ages (How Would You Survive Ser)You Wouldn't Want to Work on a Medieval Cathedral! (You Wouldn't Want to...: History of the World)You Wouldn’t Want to Work on a Medieval Cathedral! (You Wouldn’t Want to…: History of the World)You Wouldn't Want to Be a Medieval Knight! (Revised Edition) (You Wouldn't Want to...: History of the World)You Wouldn’t Want to Be a Medieval Knight! (Revised Edition) (You Wouldn’t Want to…: History of the World)You Wouldn't Want to Be in a Medieval Dungeon! (Revised Edition) (You Wouldn't Want to...: History of the World)You Wouldn’t Want to Be in a Medieval Dungeon! (Revised Edition) (You Wouldn’t Want to…: History of the World)You Wouldn't Want to Be Sick in the 16th Century! (Revised Edition) (You Wouldn't Want to...: History of the World)You Wouldn’t Want to Be Sick in the 16th Century! (Revised Edition) (You Wouldn’t Want to…: History of the World)You Wouldn't Want to Be a Crusader! (Revised Edition) (You Wouldn't Want to...: History of the World)You Wouldn’t Want to Be a Crusader! (Revised Edition) (You Wouldn’t Want to…: History of the World)

 

Historical Fiction

Saint George and the DragonSaint George and the DragonThe Knight and the Dragon (Paperstar Book)The Knight and the Dragon (Paperstar Book)The Kitchen Knight: A Tale of King ArthurThe Kitchen Knight: A Tale of King ArthurChaucer's Canterbury TalesChaucer’s Canterbury TalesKingdom's Dawn (Kingdom, Book 1)Kingdom’s Dawn (Kingdom, Book 1)The Door in the WallThe Door in the WallCrispin: The Cross of LeadCrispin: The Cross of LeadThe Midwife's ApprenticeThe Midwife’s ApprenticeThe Trumpeter of KrakowThe Trumpeter of KrakowCatherine, Called BirdyCatherine, Called BirdyAnna of Byzantium (Laurel-Leaf Books)Anna of Byzantium (Laurel-Leaf Books)

 

Medieval Books with a Christian Theme

Each of these is truly near and dear to my heart. I love them all SO very much!

The Squire and the ScrollThe Squire and the ScrollWith You All the WayWith You All the WayA Parable about the KingA Parable about the KingComing HomeComing Home

 

More Medieval Ideas For You

Because we follow a four-year history cycle, this post highlights Caleb’s 2nd trip through the Middle Ages.  The 1st trip through found us doing all sorts of hands-on learning and completing real-life projects like the “Westward Gazette,” a family newsletter.  You won’t want to miss it!

Middle Ages Unit Study: hands-on, literature-based, project ideas

If you ever have the chance to visit the Ohio Renaissance Festival, it’s a fabulous field trip to go along with any study of the Middle Ages or Renaissance!

Other posts you might enjoy:

 100+ Living Math Activities Homeschooling Middle School Using Picture Books to Teach Persuasive Writing

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6 Comments

  1. alivinglaboratory says:

    You have an incredible website! I love the hands-on activities in this unit study. Thanks for sharing.

  2. Thank you! I’m starting my homeschool journey (with my kinesthetic 9th grader) next year and am so anxious about curriculum. Your ideas are helping me realize I can be more flexible!

  3. Yes! Flexibility can be a really good thing. Have fun with your study!

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